Saraikistan


What is Saraikistan?

Saraik (SaraikiPunjabiUrduسراییکستان) is a term used by some Seraikis to denote the southern region of the Punjab province of Pakistan, inhabited by Saraiki-speaking people. Many people contest the status of Saraiki as a separate language.[1]. Though, it has overwhelming influence of Punjabi and SindhiSeraiki can be called a separate language of Indo-Aryan Family.[2] When compared to its sister languages: Sindhi and Punjabi, Saraiki is far smaller and much behind in literature and in many other ways.[3].Historically speaking, Saraiki, before Independence, never created a sense of separate Saraiki identity particularly in Southern Punjab.[4].Customs and traditions practised by the people of Southern Punjab have largely been similar to those of Punjabis and Sindhis.[5].However, national recognition of Saraiki as a separate language, giving it an official status, a Saraiki province, a Saraiki regiment in Army, establishment of Saraiki radio and television are among primary demands of Saraiki movement.[6]

In 2002, the Saraiki nationalists claimed that there are over 30 million Saraiki speakers in Pakistan, mostly in southern Punjab, and also in the adjacent parts of Sindh and Balochistan provinces, mainly based in the former princely state of Bahawalpur (princely state).

Beginning in the 1960s, Saraiki nationalists have sought to gain language rights and lessen,what the nationalists propagated as, "Punjabi control over the natural resources of 'Saraiki' lands". This has led to a proposed separate province Saraikistan, a region being drawn up by activists in the 1970.The 1977 coup by General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq of Pakistan, acentralist ruler, caused the movement to go underground. After his death in 1988 allowed the Saraiki movement to re-emerge openly with the goals to have a Saraiki nationality recognised, to have official documents printed in Saraiki, a Saraiki regiment in the Pakistan Army, employment quotas and more Saraiki language radio and television. 

Writing

Since the start of consciousness-raising efforts about common ethnic language in the 1960s, the number of Saraiki publications has increased. Most of the writings from the 1960s to the 1980s were political in nature and are coloured by the ethnopolitical aims of the writers. Even though the number of publications has increased in the last and present decade, the Saraiki intellectuals themselves admit that there is not much readership, except perhaps for the works of some renowned contemporary poets, especially of the revolutionary poet Shakir Shujaabadi. Although writings in all the regional languages are suffering from lack of readership for similar reasons, in the case of Saraiki there are two additional reasons. Firstly, most of the writers bring in colloquial phraseology (which varies from one variety to the other) in their writings and secondly, many writers, in their zeal to prove the antiquity of Saraiki language and to promote its Indo-Aryan feature, tend to use more Sanskrit words instead of the more common Arabic-Persian words in order to distinguish it from Punjabi and Urdu, thus blocking the understanding of their general readers.
 
 
Novelists
Ismail Ahmedani - probably the most celebrated novelist and fiction writer. Ahmedani has done much to promote the Saraiki language as a language for modern fiction writing. Ismail Ahmedani died at Karachi on 6 June 2007 and buried in his home village of Rasoolpur.
[edit]Fiction authors
Ismail Ahmedani, novelist and fiction writer, author of Amar Kahani, Peet de Pandh and Chhulian
Ghazala Ahmedani, fiction writer, author of Aj de Marvi
Mussrat Kalanchvi, fiction writer, author of Uchi Dharti Jhika Asman
Batool Rahmani, fiction writer
Zafar Lishari, fiction writer and novelist, author of novles Nazoo and Pahaj
Ahsan Wagha, fiction writer, author of Thal Karen Darya and Aadi Was
Hafeez Khan, fiction writer, author of Veendi Rut De Sham
Aslam Aziz Durani, fiction writer
Bast Bhutti, fiction writer
[edit]Linguists
Mehr Abdul Haq, author of Multani Zaban Ka Urdu Se Taaluq
Zami Bahawalpuri, author of Saraiki Lughat and Saraiki Zaban Ka Irtaqa
Dilshad Kalanchvi, author of Saraiki Lisaniat
Ahsan Wagha, M.Phil thesis The Saraiki Language: Its Growth and Development
Shaukat Mughal, author of Saraiki Dian Khas Awazan Di Kahani, Saraiki Muhawaray, Saraiki Masadir, Saraiki Parhoon Te Saraiki Lekhoon and others
[edit]Critics
Sadique Taher, writer of the collection of articles Wewaray
Javed Chanio, writer of a critical work on Khwaja Ghulam Farid
[edit]Poets
Khwaja Ghulam Farid (Dewan-i-Farid)
Sachal Sarmast (Schal Sarmat Jo Saraiki Kalam)
Shakir Shujabadi (Kalam-e-Shakir, Khuda Janey, Shakir Diyan Ghazlan, Peelay Patr, Munafqan Tu Khuda Bachaway, Shakir De Dohray, etc.)
Bedil Sindhi (Dewan-i-Bedil)
Hamal Leghari (Dewan-i- Hamal)
Lutf Ali (Saifal Nama)
Khurum Bahawalpuri (Khiaban-i-Kurum)
Safeer Leshari (Vepray)
Mumtaz Haider Daher (Andharay-de-Raat and Kashkool Vich Samandar)
Ashoo Lal (Chhero Hath Nah Murli)
Iqbal Sokdi
Bashir Ghamkhawr
Mustafa Khadim
Refat Abbas (Parchhian ute Phul and Sangat Ved)
Nasrullah Khan Nasir (Ajrak and Aoey Hoey)
Jahngeer Mkhlis
Qais Faridi (Nemro)
Aman-ullah Arshad
Naseer Sarmad (Sojhla)
Saeed Akhtar Sial
Bakht Fakir of Ahmad pur Lamma
Haji Qadir Gurmani
[edit]Dramatists
Ismail Ahmedani
Hafeez Khan
[edit]Singers
Mansoor Malangi
Attaullah Khan Esakhelvi
Pathanay Khan

 
Jhumar
Jhumar or Jhoomar is a lively form of music and dance that originated in the Multan and Balochistan region in Pakistan, but thrived in Punjab (Pakistan) & Sandalbar areas. It is slower and more rhythmic form of bhangra. Jhumar comes from Jhum - which means swaying. The songs evoke a quality which reminds of swaying. Though the content of these songs is varied- they are usually love with emotional songs too. The Jhummar is a dance of ecstasy.
Jhumar is a folk dance performed during the harvest season in Punjab. It is a living demonstration of the happiness of men. The dance is mostly performed by the Baluchi and Seraiki people of Southern Punjab.
Any time is Jhummar time especially during Melas, weddings and other major functions and celebrations. The emphasis of Jhumar is recreating the gaits of animals and birds. The movement of animals, the ploughing of the field, sowing of seeds and harvesting are shown in the original progression. The dance is also performed in circle, to the tune of emotional songs. The costumes of the dancers are very colorful.
 
Dancing Style

Performed exclusively by men, It is a common feature to see three generations - father, son and grandson - dancing all together. The dance is without acrobatics. The movement of the arms only is considered its main forte. Toes are musically placed in front and backwards and turnings are taken to the right, sometimes the dancers place their one hand below the ribs on the left and gesticulate with the right hand. This dance does not tire out its performers and it is normally danced on moonlight nights in the villages away from the habitation. The dancers of this dance let-off a sound, "dee dee" in tune with the beat of the dance which adds to its grace. This dance has also been integrated into Bhangra.
[edit]Types Of Jhumar

There are three main types of jhummar, each of which has a different mood, and is therefore suited to different occasionally, reason of its predominating mood. They are:
satluj jhummar
beas jhummar

    

 

 


[edit]
Writing

Since the start of consciousness-raising efforts about common ethnic language in the 1960s, the number of Saraiki publications has increased. Most of the writings from the 1960s to the 1980s were political in nature and are coloured by the ethnopolitical aims of the writers. Even though the number of publications has increased in the last and present decade, the Saraiki intellectuals themselves admit that there is not much readership, except perhaps for the works of some renowned contemporary poets, especially of the revolutionary poet Shakir Shujaabadi. Although writings in all the regional languages are suffering from lack of readership for similar reasons, in the case of Saraiki there are two additional reasons. Firstly, most of the writers bring in colloquial phraseology (which varies from one variety to the other) in their writings and secondly, many writers, in their zeal to prove the antiquity of Saraiki language and to promote its Indo-Aryan feature, tend to use more Sanskrit words instead of the more common Arabic-Persian words in order to distinguish it from Punjabi and Urdu, thus blocking the understanding of their general readers.
 
 
Novelists
Ismail Ahmedani - probably the most celebrated novelist and fiction writer. Ahmedani has done much to promote the Saraiki language as a language for modern fiction writing. Ismail Ahmedani died at Karachi on 6 June 2007 and buried in his home village of Rasoolpur.
[edit]Fiction authors
Ismail Ahmedani, novelist and fiction writer, author of Amar Kahani, Peet de Pandh and Chhulian
Ghazala Ahmedani, fiction writer, author of Aj de Marvi
Mussrat Kalanchvi, fiction writer, author of Uchi Dharti Jhika Asman
Batool Rahmani, fiction writer
Zafar Lishari, fiction writer and novelist, author of novles Nazoo and Pahaj
Ahsan Wagha, fiction writer, author of Thal Karen Darya and Aadi Was
Hafeez Khan, fiction writer, author of Veendi Rut De Sham
Aslam Aziz Durani, fiction writer
Bast Bhutti, fiction writer
[edit]Linguists
Mehr Abdul Haq, author of Multani Zaban Ka Urdu Se Taaluq
Zami Bahawalpuri, author of Saraiki Lughat and Saraiki Zaban Ka Irtaqa
Dilshad Kalanchvi, author of Saraiki Lisaniat
Ahsan Wagha, M.Phil thesis The Saraiki Language: Its Growth and Development
Shaukat Mughal, author of Saraiki Dian Khas Awazan Di Kahani, Saraiki Muhawaray, Saraiki Masadir, Saraiki Parhoon Te Saraiki Lekhoon and others
[edit]Critics
Sadique Taher, writer of the collection of articles Wewaray
Javed Chanio, writer of a critical work on Khwaja Ghulam Farid
[edit]Poets
Khwaja Ghulam Farid (Dewan-i-Farid)
Sachal Sarmast (Schal Sarmat Jo Saraiki Kalam)
Shakir Shujabadi (Kalam-e-Shakir, Khuda Janey, Shakir Diyan Ghazlan, Peelay Patr, Munafqan Tu Khuda Bachaway, Shakir De Dohray, etc.)
Bedil Sindhi (Dewan-i-Bedil)
Hamal Leghari (Dewan-i- Hamal)
Lutf Ali (Saifal Nama)
Khurum Bahawalpuri (Khiaban-i-Kurum)
Safeer Leshari (Vepray)
Mumtaz Haider Daher (Andharay-de-Raat and Kashkool Vich Samandar)
Ashoo Lal (Chhero Hath Nah Murli)
Iqbal Sokdi
Bashir Ghamkhawr
Mustafa Khadim
Refat Abbas (Parchhian ute Phul and Sangat Ved)
Nasrullah Khan Nasir (Ajrak and Aoey Hoey)
Jahngeer Mkhlis
Qais Faridi (Nemro)
Aman-ullah Arshad
Naseer Sarmad (Sojhla)
Saeed Akhtar Sial
Bakht Fakir of Ahmad pur Lamma
Haji Qadir Gurmani
[edit]Dramatists
Ismail Ahmedani
Hafeez Khan
[edit]Singers
Mansoor Malangi
Attaullah Khan Esakhelvi
Pathanay Khan

 
Jhumar
Jhumar or Jhoomar is a lively form of music and dance that originated in the Multan and Balochistan region in Pakistan, but thrived in Punjab (Pakistan) & Sandalbar areas. It is slower and more rhythmic form of bhangra. Jhumar comes from Jhum - which means swaying. The songs evoke a quality which reminds of swaying. Though the content of these songs is varied- they are usually love with emotional songs too. The Jhummar is a dance of ecstasy.
Jhumar is a folk dance performed during the harvest season in Punjab. It is a living demonstration of the happiness of men. The dance is mostly performed by the Baluchi and Seraiki people of Southern Punjab.
Any time is Jhummar time especially during Melas, weddings and other major functions and celebrations. The emphasis of Jhumar is recreating the gaits of animals and birds. The movement of animals, the ploughing of the field, sowing of seeds and harvesting are shown in the original progression. The dance is also performed in circle, to the tune of emotional songs. The costumes of the dancers are very colorful.
 
Dancing Style

Performed exclusively by men, It is a common feature to see three generations - father, son and grandson - dancing all together. The dance is without acrobatics. The movement of the arms only is considered its main forte. Toes are musically placed in front and backwards and turnings are taken to the right, sometimes the dancers place their one hand below the ribs on the left and gesticulate with the right hand. This dance does not tire out its performers and it is normally danced on moonlight nights in the villages away from the habitation. The dancers of this dance let-off a sound, "dee dee" in tune with the beat of the dance which adds to its grace. This dance has also been integrated into Bhangra.
[edit]Types Of Jhumar

There are three main types of jhummar, each of which has a different mood, and is therefore suited to different occasionally, reason of its predominating mood. They are:
satluj jhummar
beas jhummar
chenab jhummar